Marsch suggests Patrick Bamford changed the game in Leeds loss
Photo by Eddie Keogh/Getty Images

Marsch suggests Patrick Bamford changed the game in Leeds loss

Jesse Marsch has suggested that Patrick Bamford changed the game when he came on for Leeds United against Arsenal on Sunday, with the boss confident that the striker is about to hit form for the Whites – in comments reported by Leeds Live.

Bamford had a really mixed afternoon up against the Gunners. The Englishman came on at half-time after Rodrigo’s terrible error led to the only goal of the game.

Photo by Robbie Jay Barratt – AMA/Getty Images

Within a couple of minutes, Bamford had the ball in the back of the net. However, a foul was given against the forward as he appeared to nudge Gabriel.

Leeds were then awarded a penalty after William Saliba handled the ball in the penalty area. Unfortunately, Bamford then put his effort wide.

Photo by Eddie Keogh/Getty Images

The 29-year-old must have been wondering whether it was ever going to be his day. When he did have other opportunities, Aaron Ramsdale was able to keep him at bay.

Bamford changed the game

And when he thought he had won a late penalty, VAR intervened and overturned the decision, seemingly ignoring that Gabriel had still kicked out at the Leeds man.

Nevertheless, Marsch was clearly encouraged by what he saw from Bamford as he was asked whether he changed the game.

“I think so,” he said, as reported by Leeds Live. “I think the thing with Patrick is that I said even in the press conference this week is if a striker is not getting chances, then you’re more worried about it than if he’s missing them.

“Obviously a penalty winds up being more of like a psychological issue when you miss the frame then even a quality issue. But I feel like Patrick’s coming into form, he’s looking physically strong and now hopefully we can develop a rhythm with him and we can be a different team if he can catch on fire.”

One goal could make all the difference for Bamford. As things stand, he is still awaiting his first of the campaign. And the longer that run goes on, the more pressure will build up.

As Marsch suggests, he was excellent in so many ways on Sunday. And we do appear to be a lot more dangerous when Bamford is leading the line.

But it seems absolutely imperative now that Bamford’s wait for a goal does not go on much longer.

Have something to tell us about this article?
Let us know